Final #7dRTS :(((

Welp, I’m conceding defeat.
A huge draw bug has occurred.

Simply, units you can control live in an array. You have a dragbox to select them.
Once the dragbox falls over them, their respective select() method is called. This turns flips a boolean to true and changes their colour.
Simple.

For all units (except the final one) doing the select procedure calls the method select() but the colour does not change. You can actually issue individual commands to them still.
If you select the final unit in the array, all units are coloured but only the final one has the select() method called.
Bizarre…

I tested by creating a different way to select them (using the exact same methods) and it works. Reducing the population to 1 also works (the only unit is the end of the array.)
It seems like the dragbox doesn’t it EXCEPT that the select() methods on the units that should be selected is called at the correct times.

Painfully aggravating.

I’ve run about 10 different tests and I end up with the same issue so I’m thinking it’s a draw issue. Still, it could be something glaringly obvious.

So, that’s that.
Final screenshots
RPG Mode:(Ignore that minimap issue…)

RTS Mode:

As this will be my last game for quite sometime, this is most disheartening. But hey, in my 3rd attempt to make an RTS, this is by far the furthest I’ve gotten. A shame to be cut down by such a silly bug.

After the cut is me rambling on about the concept. (Which I actually rather enjoy.)

Okay. This all began with the idea of isolation.
You are an inhabitant in a town that has no connection to the outside. This had a couple of variations:

  • The town was forced to be closed by a military-like force. Would have had patrolling guards. Also would have had recruitable units.
  • The town had been cut-off for thousands of years but no-one ever dared to venture outside. Also would have had recruitable units.

The key difference between those two is the motive of the protagonist. The former is purely the protagonist’s yearning for freedom outside once again. The latter’s is the protagonist is tired of tradition and people’s contentedness to remain where they are without knowing anything of the world around them. (That last one sounds a little familiar but I came up with it before watching SNK.)

The former I thought was a goer for a little while. Little being the operative word here.
I started off using this concept and by day 2 (I think) I was very sick of it. Why? It wasn’t very good from a narrative stand-point.

So, I spent a little bit thinking again. I went back to the 2nd idea.
I then remembered I have a concept for something kinda similar but instead of physical walls, the walls lie in the protagonists mind and it’s a metaphor for learning how shitty the world is blah blah blah.
So I combined them.
And named it [eyknir].

So, I’ll describe how it goes in an procedural fashion:

  • You start in RPG mode. You can talk to inhabitants of the town and learn their views. Eventually, you’ll speak to everyone and you’ll go to sleep.
  • Next, in a subconcious state (dream or not…) you’ll have to do battle with various aspects of ones self in RTS mode. In your arsenal you have Confidence, Knowledge, Curiosity and Willpower. The enemy has Mediocrity, Tradition, Laziness and Subservience.
  • There are resources, sort of. Energy and Motivation. Energy decreases over time and is halted by destroying an enemy. Motivation increases everytime an enemy is destroyed. Once Motivation reaches its max, you can build a new unit.
  • After the RTS mode, you go back into RPG mode where the inhabitants speak in a slightly different tone. The colours of the town also change slightly.
  • You talk to the people, do battle and so on, all the time the town is getting worse and the people are getting weird.
  • If you lose, you return to a perpetual state of mediocrity.

So, that’s how [eyknir] goes.
It deals with ignorance, truth and perception.

The world is not always as we perceive it to be, but we strive to perceive it in a way where ignorance and truth can be balanced out. A total truth can be just as harmful as total ignorance.

Because I have to make all my games deep or something…
Fuck, I might find time to make a Twine game from this idea.

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